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Frances Newman Photograph

 Collection
Identifier: VAM005

  • Staff Only

Abstract

This collection contains one photograph of Frances Newman. This is the same photograph that appeared in the 1924 Atlanta Constitution article announcing Miss Newman as the new librarian at Georgia Tech.

Dates

  • ca. 1920-1924

Creator

General Physical Description note

(1 photograph)

Restrictions: Access

None.

Restrictions: Use

Permission to publish materials from this collection must be obtained from the Head of Archives and Special Collections.

Extent

0.05 Linear Feet

Scope and Contents

This collection contains one photograph of Frances Newman. This is the same photograph that appeared in the 1924 Atlanta Constitution article announcing Miss Newman as the new librarian at Georgia Tech.

Biography of Frances Newman

Frances Newman was born on September 13, 1883 in Atlanta, Georgia, the daughter of William Truslow and Frances Perry Alexander Newman. Her mother was a descendant of early Tennessee settlers (the great-granddaughter of the founder of Knoxville, Tennessee).

Newman's schooling included Calhoun Street School, Washington Seminary, and Agnes Scott College (Decatur, Ga.). She graduated from the Atlanta Carnegie Library (later Emory University School of Library Science) in June 1912.

After completing her education, Newman worked as the librarian at the Florida State College for Women in 1913. In 1913 or 1914, she was the librarian for the Atlanta Carnegie Library (now Atlanta-Fulton Public Library). In 1923, she left Atlanta for a year to study at the Sorbonne in Paris. In 1924, she returned to Atlanta and became head librarian for the Georgia School of Technology. She held this position for two years.

She started her literary career by reviewing books. A friend, James Branch Cabell, encouraged her to work on other literary pieces. She wrote her first short story in 1924, titled Rachel and Her Children, which won the O Henry Memorial Prize. That same year, she published The Short Story's Mutations. By 1926, Newman had completed her first novel, The Hard-Boiled Virgin. The second followed in 1927, Dead Lovers are Faithful Lovers. Her last work, Six Moral Tales from Jules Laforgue (translation), was published posthumously. She died suddenly on October 22, 1928 in New York City. Although it was reported that she died of pneumonia and a brain hemorrhage, it was discovered that a drug overdose was the true cause of death.

Newman never married, but raised her nephew, Louis Rucker, after the death of her sister. Newman had two brothers: Henry and William T., Jr.; and three sisters: Isabel Howard, Lucy Rucker, and Margaret Patterson (of Richmond, Virginia).

Other Finding Aids

A print copy of this finding aid is available in the Georgia Tech Archives reading room.

Provenance

Accession #1985.0802.

Related Materials

Another photograph of Frances Newman is located in the Georgia Tech Photograph Collection, Box 22, Folder 66, Item VA2220.

Photographs of Frances Newman's grave site, along with the grave sites of other Newman family members, can be found in the Newman Family Grave Stones Photograph Collection VAC344.

Separated Material

The manuscript materials are processed separately as the Frances Newman Papers MS005.

General Physical Description note

(1 photograph)

Processing Information

Mandi D. Johnson processed this photograph in June 2008.
Title
Inventory of the Frances Newman Photograph, ca. 1920-1924
Subtitle
VAM005
Status
Completed
Author
Mandi D. Johnson
Date
Copyright June 2008.
Description rules
dacs
Language of description
Finding aid is written in English.

Repository Details

Part of the Archives and Special Collections, Library, Georgia Institute of Technology Repository

Contact:
Library
Georgia Institute of Technology
266 4th Street, NW
Atlanta 30332-0900 USA
404-894-4586