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Software

 Subject
Subject Source: Wikidata
Scope Note: non-tangible executable component of a computer. See also: http://vocab.getty.edu/aat/300028566 and http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh99001417. retroTECH.

Found in 7 Collections and/or Records:

Apple iMac, 1998

 Series
Identifier: 50671014228891
Scope and Contents Manufactured and sold starting in 1998, this was the first consumer-facing Apple product released after Steve Jobs' return to the company. This model is often called "the computer that saved Apple" because it was largely responsible for Apple's economic turnaround after its dramatic decline in the early 1990s.The highly innovative style positioned Apple as s design-oriented company, but this model was criticized for abandoning standards like the floppy-disk drive and using only USB...

Apple Macintosh Performa 550, 1994

 Series
Scope and Contents Introduced in October 1993 and available until April 1996, Macintosh Performa 550 featured a more powerful processor than the earlier LC 520. The Performa 550 featured only consumer applications, as opposed to other Performa variants which also included business applications, and was initially sold at a price tag on $2000. The Performa series of computers came about as part of Apple’s efforts to expand past the professional market into the consumer market. At the time, agreements...

Apple Power Macintosh 8500/120, 1995

 Series
Scope and Contents The Power Macintosh/Power Mac was the mainstay of Apple's top-end line for twelve years from 1994 to 2006 until the line was replaced by the Mac Pro and included a built-in Mac 68K emulator for earlier Mac software. The lower-end counterparts to the Power Mac series were the iMac (for personal home use) and the eMac (for educational use).Manufactured from 1995 to 1997, the Power Macintosh 8500 was billed as a high-end graphics computer (featuring nearly broadcast-quality A/V input...

CS2110 retroTECH Collection

 Collection
Identifier: RT00029
Content Description This collection contains software and stories from Georgia Tech's CS2110 course, Computer Organization and Programming. CS2110 offers an introduction to basic computer hardware, machine language, assembly language, and C programming. As part of the course, students create games for the Game Boy Advance. This collection includes selections of the games, as well as oral histories with the student game creators.

CS2261 retroTECH Collection

 Collection
Identifier: RT00030
Content Description This collection contains software and stories from Georgia Tech's CS2261 course, Media Device Architecture. CS2261 covers knowledge related to controlling the interface between hardware and software in media devices, as well as machine-level programming (e.g., in C) to create graphics, generate sound, and support user interaction. As part of the course, students create games for the Game Boy Advance. This collection includes selections of the games, as well as oral histories with the student...

Ribbit, 1982

 Item
Content Description From the Collection: This collection contains software and an oral history that tell the story of Dr. Lance Fortnow’s Ribbit game, created in 1982. Dr. Fortnow was formerly Chair of the School of Computer Science at Georgia Tech.

Technology Opportunities Analysis retroTECH Oral History Collection

 Collection
Identifier: RT00031
Content Description This collection contains oral histories related to software supporting the Technology Opportunities Analysis approach, which was developed at Georgia Tech by a team led by Dr. Alan L. Porter. The underlying software used in this approach was known as the Technology Opportunities Analysis Knowbot or System, originally coded by Dr. Porter's son Doug Porter. This technology was developed through a university-small business public-private partnership collaboration between Georgia Tech and Search...